And who knows which is which and who is who ...

One of these days I´ll gonna cut you into little pieces

(Source: sizvideos, via sagansense)

teded:

Happy International Coffee Day! Bottoms up!
From the TED-Ed Lesson The case of the vanishing honeybees - Emma Bryce
Animation by Lillian Chan

teded:

Happy International Coffee Day! Bottoms up!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The case of the vanishing honeybees - Emma Bryce

Animation by Lillian Chan

alexmilsommedia:

A Step Back In Time 
Explore..

(via 2dots)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Saturday morning Japan’s Mount Ontake erupted unexpectedly, sending a pyroclastic flow streaming down the mountain. Many, though sadly not all, of the volcano’s hikers and visitors survived the eruption. Pyroclastic flows are fast-moving turbulent and often super-heated clouds filled with ash and poisonous gases. They can reach speeds of 700 kph and temperatures of 1000 degrees C. The usual gases released in a pyroclastic flow are denser than air, causing the cloud to remain near the ground. This is problematic for those trying to escape because the poisonous gases can fill the same low-lying areas in which survivors shelter. Heavy ashfall from the flow can destroy buildings or cause mudslides, and the fine volcanic glass particles in the ash are dangerous to inhale. The sheer power and scale of these geophysical flows is stunning to behold. Those who have witnessed it firsthand and survived are incredibly fortunate. For more on the science and history of Mount Ontake, see this detailed write-up at io9. (Image credits: A. Shimbun, source video; K. Terutoshi, source video; via io9)

sci-universe:

It turns out the origins of one of the most essential things in our lives date back over 4.6 billion years. A recent experiment conducted by Ilse Cleeves at the University of Michigan suggests that much of Earth’s (and Solar System’s) water may be older than the Sun, and likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space. I think the famous picture above (by  Melzzeny on DeviantArt) becomes pretty relevant now.
Not to mention, the study indicates that abundant, organic-rich interstellar ices should probably be found in all young planetary systems and that would obviously have implications for the emergence of life elsewhere. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being. Read about the team’s work here»

sci-universe:

It turns out the origins of one of the most essential things in our lives date back over 4.6 billion years. A recent experiment conducted by Ilse Cleeves at the University of Michigan suggests that much of Earth’s (and Solar System’s) water may be older than the Sun, and likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space. I think the famous picture above (by Melzzeny on DeviantArt) becomes pretty relevant now.

Not to mention, the study indicates that abundant, organic-rich interstellar ices should probably be found in all young planetary systems and that would obviously have implications for the emergence of life elsewhere. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being. Read about the team’s work here»

(via sagansense)