And who knows which is which and who is who ...

One of these days I´ll gonna cut you into little pieces
mindblowingscience:

The Ebola virus is mutating faster in humans than in animal hosts

A study that some early researchers in Sierra Leone gave their lives for has yielded incredibly important results, reports ABC Science.
The study, published in Science, reveals the rates of mutation in the deadly Ebola virus, that has so far claimed the lives of more than 1,000 people, including more than 140 health care workers. 
The samples, taken from 78 infected individuals, show that during the early outbreak more than 300 genetic changes occurred as the virus moved from person to person. Scientists say the virus is mutating about twice as fast in humans than it was in animal hosts, such as fruit bats. 
The team used a technique called deep sequencing, which allowed them to track changes in genetic sequences between different patients and within different cells inside a single patient.
The research revealed that the virus’ protein coat has changed, which could suggest that it is now better able to bind to human cells and evade the immune system.
The mutations may be significant if they reduce the effectiveness of diagnostic tests and treatments currently being developed. 
The data was pre-published online and Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Scripps Research Institute in the US says her lab has already checked whether the mutations will affect the drug they are developing to fight Ebola. It appears they do not but further tests are required to see if other drugs are still going to work.
The Ebola virus is likely to spread further and the World Health Organisation reports that some 20,000 people are at risk of infection.

mindblowingscience:

The Ebola virus is mutating faster in humans than in animal hosts

A study that some early researchers in Sierra Leone gave their lives for has yielded incredibly important results, reports ABC Science.

The study, published in Science, reveals the rates of mutation in the deadly Ebola virus, that has so far claimed the lives of more than 1,000 people, including more than 140 health care workers

The samples, taken from 78 infected individuals, show that during the early outbreak more than 300 genetic changes occurred as the virus moved from person to person. Scientists say the virus is mutating about twice as fast in humans than it was in animal hosts, such as fruit bats. 

The team used a technique called deep sequencing, which allowed them to track changes in genetic sequences between different patients and within different cells inside a single patient.

The research revealed that the virus’ protein coat has changed, which could suggest that it is now better able to bind to human cells and evade the immune system.

The mutations may be significant if they reduce the effectiveness of diagnostic tests and treatments currently being developed. 

The data was pre-published online and Erica Ollmann Saphire of the Scripps Research Institute in the US says her lab has already checked whether the mutations will affect the drug they are developing to fight Ebola. It appears they do not but further tests are required to see if other drugs are still going to work.

The Ebola virus is likely to spread further and the World Health Organisation reports that some 20,000 people are at risk of infection.

(via oxidoreductase)

capturingthecosmos:

the-wolf-and-moon:

Comet Jacques & The Heart & Soul Nebulae

Incredible.

capturingthecosmos:

the-wolf-and-moon:

Comet Jacques & The Heart & Soul Nebulae

Incredible.

(via oxidoreductase)

child-of-thecosmos:

Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 

But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

(via oxidoreductase)

Los cronopios tienen conductas de poetas, de asociales. Pierden la cabeza cuando se enamoran; dejan de escribir en el papel, y comienzan a escribir poemas en todas partes. ¿Qué hace un cronopio cuando se enamora? Pierde la cabeza, eso y se dedica a cortar margaritas. Cuando a un cronopio le rompen el corazón, llora un poco, y luego un poco más. Se sabe “desdichado y húmedo”. Pero mientras llora, piensa en que a todos alguna vez les rompen el corazón. En que enamorarse significa también llorar un poco. Y que a diferencia de los famas, el cronopio llora cuando tiene ganas, y como tiene ganas, llora un poco más…

Por el contrario, cuando una fama se enamora lo anota minuciosamente en una libreta. Lo anota minuciosamente sin olvidar escribir la fecha y la hora en que se enamoro. Lo anota minuciosamente.
Compra rosas. Seis. Siempre seis. Y las regala.
Una fama jamás se enamora de un cronopio. Los famas solo se enamoran de famas.
Cuando a un fama le rompen el corazón, decide que el amor es cosa de cronopios. Corta minuciosamente la hoja de su libreta en la que había escrito me enamore y la “envuelve de pies a cabeza en una sabana negra y la coloca parada en una pared con un cartelito que dice”: cuando creí (erróneamente) que una fama podía enamorarse

Y, por supuesto ¿Qué hace un cronopio encubierto cuando se enamora?

Pierde un poco la cabeza, pero lo disimula. Lo anota en una libreta minuciosamente, luego olvida la libreta y lo anota en todas partes. No usa reloj, porque no lo entiende. Pero si usara y lo entendiera, olvidaría como usarlo. No corta margaritas pero se tienta. No compra rosas. Se las roba y las regala. No dibuja en libretas, pinta al oleo y se llama así mismo: artista.
Un cronopio encubierto jamás se enamora de una fama. Los cronopios encubiertos solo se enamoran de cronopios. Los famas son tentaciones pasajeras.
Cuando a un cronopio encubierto le rompen el corazón, bebe whisky salado sentado en algún barcito donde nadie lo conozca. Fuma tabaco caro. Y decide que prefiere ser fama.

Por ultimo; Las esperanzas. Estas representan las clases bajas de la sociedad, a la espera. Vale recordar que la esperanza es lo único que queda dentro de la caja cuando escapan de ella los males en el mito de Pandora. Pero lo que es un mal es la espera, su apatismo. Mientras los famas bailan Tregua Tregua los cronopios y los esperanzas bailan ESPERA, que es el baile de ellos, y se enojan mucho por las raras costumbres de los famas. Ellas se enamoran, pero en secreto; no se sienten desdichados cuando les rompen el corazon, siguen esperando a su encuentro con el amor. Cuando se enamoran piensan que no es real y esperan a que termine. No hay mucho que decir de ellas; no caben muy bien en el mundo del cronopio

Cronopios, famas y esperanzas. ¿Que pasa cuando se enamoran? Julio Cortazar (via escucha-lo-que-siento)

(via psycho-killer-fafafafafafafa)

sagansense:

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos. NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)


Watching a robotic extension of ourselves observing a moon transiting the nearest star…

sagansense:

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos.
NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

Watching a robotic extension of ourselves observing a moon transiting the nearest star…

brutalgeneration:

IMG_3694.jpg (by nixpix88)

sagansense:

From the HuffPost article:

Alex Bellini plans to mourn the loss of Arctic ice on a far more intimate level than many of us could imagine. He’ll live an entire year on an iceberg off Greenland “witnessing its last phase of life.

In the video above, Bellini spells out what the thaw around Greenland could mean for the rest of the world — and it’s scary.

I feel the urge to act, to do something, he explains. He says he hopes his expedition will bring about a change in attitude toward global warming. This will become an era of responsibility.

An iceberg is reflected in calm water at the mouth of the Jakobshavns ice fjord near Ilulissat, Greenland,near where Alex Bellini will find an iceberg to spend a year living on to highlight the effects of climate change. [source]

Bellini plans to board an iceberg in spring 2015 and live in a pod similar to a lunar module, breaking his solitude to occasionally meet with bloggers and writers so he can spread the word, according to the vid. He’ll bring 300 kilograms of dried food plus electronics equipment, Motherboard reported in an earlier article.

When the iceberg can no longer support him, he said he will take to sea in his module and wait to be rescued.

@AlexBellini1

This is important. This IS a publicity scheme. Because a scheme is a large-scale systematic plan or arrangement for attaining some particular object or putting a particular idea into effect. And this is an idea the whole of humanity need to embrace, take to the polls, to the streets, and in their every day conversations.

Listen to Carl…

Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet.

— Carl Sagan

diamondpearson:

Grateful Dead.

diamondpearson:

Grateful Dead.

(via aknaujsoulrebel)